Twitter for iOS may soon add native Live Photos support

“A social media researcher stumbled upon code inside Twitter’s iOS app that seemingly adds native support to convert Live Photos into GIFs”

Twitter may be testing a new feature that allows its users on iOS devices to directly share Live Photos on the microblogging platform. Social media researcher Matt Navarra, who is known for revealing new and upcoming features by deciphering codes within applications, stated that the latest version of the Twitter for iOS app includes code that, once enabled, can allow for Live Photos to be instantly converted to GIFs and simultaneously be posted on the medium.

Navarra’s code is indeed true, but that does not guarantee anything. As far as we know, Twitter has not launched this feature even as a beta to users, although posting Live Photos on iOS as GIFs on Twitter sounds like a feature that may become very popular among users. Apple introduced the Live Photos feature alongside iOS 11 with similar intention. While Facebook does support posting and viewing of Live Photos in their native nature, the adaptation and implementation of the feature has been very limited.

As a result, Live Photos never really took off and till date remains an extra feature that not many around the world really find useful. However, if Twitter indeed rolls out this feature, then Live Photos may receive a renewed lifeline. For the social media-savvy crowd, posting GIFs as response to comments on social media is quite popular and with Twitter being a popular medium for the younger crowd, it can prove to be a strategically sound decision.

However, Twitter has so far remained quiet on whether it at all intends to roll out native support for Live Photos or is simply one of the many proposed features that never make to production. Every service uses a bunch of ideas and adds them to the code in a bid to be enabled in future if required. With the Live Photos feature not enabled yet even in beta, we cannot be sure if it would even make it to a public version.

A lover of anything that has a circuit and involves physics, Shouvik is passionate about technology, science and journalism in equal parts. When not at work, he prefers reading up on ancient history, sports and engineering, going on random photography expeditions, and occasionally a long solo drive. He's also neck-deep into science fiction, and is working on a debut novel that he hopes will one day be read by Steven Erikson.
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